Archive for January, 2013

Sense of Personal Betrayal at Root of Real Housewives Star Suit Against Blog Commenter

Thursday, January 31st, 2013

Reality-television star Lisa Hochstein is suing a blog commenter for saying Hochstein “was an escort who also did soft porn in Vegas.”

Hochstein, who is an ensemble case member of Bravo’s The Real Housewives of Miami, says the defendant, Jessica Lederman, has been to Hochstein’s house. And that’s apparently what spurred her to sue.

“This person is an acquaintance we’ve invited in our home and who has smiled in our faces. She had no shame in saying these horrible things,” Hochstein told the Miami Herald. “The fact that she knows me and I’ve seen her in my home, well, it just sits the wrong way . I’m not going to go after every blogger and commenter out there. Trust me, I’ve been called way worse. I have thick skin as part of this whole show, but this really struck a chord.”

The legal claims appear to be intentional infliction of emotional distress and defamation with a prayer for $15,000.

Hochstein says she didn’t file the lawsuit for publicity reasons. Instead, it’s personal.

“I didn’t want it to get out of hand and I’m all for freedom of speech, but when you know someone personally and act like you’re friendly with them and then go making an accusation like that, it’s a big deal. What have I done to her?”

More:

Miami Herald: #RHOM’s Lisa Hochstein speaks out on controversial blog commenter lawsuit

TMZ.com: ‘REAL HOUSEWIVES’ STAR Sues Internet Commenter Over Call Girl Remarks

Sunshine Week 2013 Set for Mid-March

Wednesday, January 30th, 2013

Sunshine Week – Your Right to KnowSunshine Week, a journalist-created annual event to raise awareness about open government, will be held March 10–16, 2013. The initiative is being coordinated by the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press and the American Society of News Editors.

A schedule of events, many of which will be in Washington, D.C., has been put up at the event’s website.

Sunshine Week is sponsored annually by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Corporate mass-media firm Bloomberg LP has kicked in a grant for 2013.

What is now Sunshine Week was started as Sunshine Sunday in 2002 by the Florida Society of Newspaper Editors. The group launched the event in response to efforts afoot in the Florida legislature to add several exemptions to the state’s public-records law. FSNE credits its initiative with leading to the defeat of around 300 exemptions proposed in the Sunshine State legislature.

Blog Law Blog can’t help but wonder if the Florida-born Sunshine Week is meant to correspond with Spring Break in Daytona Beach. The timing sure is peculiar. And, when you think about it, open-records laws and in-mouth margarita mixing can both lead to exposures of a type. Yikes. Well, here’s to hoping for more being revealed by governments than drunk college students this spring.

Aaron Swartz, Champion of Online Freedom, Dead at 26

Tuesday, January 15th, 2013

Aaron Swartz, a computer programmer who helped create RSS – the open blog syndication standard – and who helped launch Reddit, took his own life on Friday.

His funeral is today in Highland Park, Illinois.

Swartz was facing the prospect of a very long time in prison because of his alleged attempt to download the JSTOR academic archive database, ostensibly to make it available for free.

Swartz was very much a good guy. His prosecution is an example of what happens when the justice system loses its moral compass. He will be very much missed.

A memorial website has been set up.

More:

How to Stop Annoying Notifications on Your Phone

Wednesday, January 9th, 2013

Does your phone give you a peppy little notification sound, but then not give you any indication of what it was notifying you about, even after you thought you turned all the notifications off in all your apps?

Would you like to set an alarm on your phone that vibrates silently, without forcing you to choose some sound to play?

If your answer to either of these questions is yes, then I have the simplest hack in the world for you: Silence.

Here you can download an mp3 file consisting of one second of silence:

[right click to download]

Put this little block of silence on your phone like you would a song.

To get rid of all default sound notifications across all apps, select the block of silence as your default notification sound. If you want a specific app to actually be able to notify you with a sound, then if the app allows you to select a different notification sound, then do so for that app.

To have a silent vibrating alarm, then, with your clock or alarm app, select this as the alarm sound, then optionally select vibrate.

You could also choose silence as the personalized ringtone for someone – if that suits your purposes.

The block of silence – or several of them together – is also a way to add spacers between songs in your iTunes playlist (or Banshee, Amarok, Clementine, or other music player software).

Why did I choose to put this up on the blog today? Well, you guessed it, my phone just made a little notification sound and it left no trace of why.

I like my little phone most of the time, but I’m tired of it acting like everything it does is the MOST IMPORTANT thing in my life.

DING! I JUST UPDATED YOUR AIRLINE APP!! Gee, thanks for letting me know that while I’m getting cut off in a construction zone during a rainstorm. And if your battery level gets too low for your comfort, why don’t you let me know that, too, and I’ll just pull over on the side of this bridge and try to flag down a trucker so I can take care of that for you.

After decades of advancement in electronics, we have somehow circled back to the equivalent of the blinking 12:00 from VCRs of the 1980s.

Maybe technology really is cyclical.

Intellectual Property and Social Media (Part 1)

Sunday, January 6th, 2013

Right now at the American Association of Law School’s annual conference, the Section on Intellectual Property is about to present a panel called “Intellectual Property and Social Media.” It’s another on-point topic for Blog Law Blog

The abstract/write-up is below. I’ll blog some realtime coverage on Twitter @tweetlawtweets with a follow-up posted here later.

Social media, such as Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and 23andMe, have changed the ways we communicate, create, innovate, and advertise. As the components of creation and brand- ing become more social, collaborative, instantaneous, and atomistic, various legal doctrines that have long governed copyright, patent, and trademark law may need to be rethought. Social media are being used to further genetic research, change how content is made, and draw users into the innovative process. This panel considers the challenges raised by social media to traditional intellectual property law, and explores the doctrinal implications of those challenges.

Politics and the Media, Old & New (Part 1)

Saturday, January 5th, 2013

Right now at the American Association of Law School’s annual conference, the Section on Internet and Computer Law and the Section on Mass Communication Law are about to have a panel on a great topic: “Politics and the Media, New and Old”.

The abstract/write-up is below. (It’s very on-point for Blog Law Blog.) I’ll blog some coverage live once we start up, both here and on Twitter @tweetlawtweets.

As the Supreme Court recognized in ACLU v. Reno, “the Internet is ‘a unique and wholly new medium of worldwide human communication’.” Among its unique features is that the Internet democratizes the opportunity to engage in political speech by offering ready access to any speaker with an Internet connection to large potential audiences at the local, state, national or global levels. This program assesses the impact the Internet has had to date on the relationship between the media and public officials or political candidates. Traditional newspapers are struggling to find a sustainable business model and appear to be losing some influence over the policy agenda or public officials’ conduct. Internet-only publications and other forms of political speech on the Internet have a complicated relationship with traditional media organizations, which, of course, also rely on the Internet to interact with their audiences. To what extent are these changes fostering or inhibiting democracy? Is law reform necessary in response to these changes?