Likes, Takedowns, and Server Seizures – Great Posts from Goldman’s Blog

Eric Goldman

Here’s just some of the required reading coming off of Eric Goldman’s Technology and Law Marketing Blog:

Facebook “Likes” Aren’t Speech Protected By the First Amendment–Bland v. Roberts

This is a case where a sheriff fired sheriff’s department workers after they Facebook-liked the sheriff’s opponent in an upcoming bid for re-election. Venkat Balasubramani and Eric G. explain why the court’s wrong that liking someone on FB isn’t protected First Amendment speech. I agree, of course. It’s a baffling decision.

512(f) Plaintiff Can’t Get Discovery to Back Up His Allegations of Bogus Takedowns–Ouellette v. Viacom

This is exactly the kind of thing your civil procedure professor was talking about when they said “procedure is substance.” Big Hollywood is free to machine-gun takedown notices out there, and despite a substantive legal right to get redress for such bogus takedowns, the procedural requirements make the right nearly worthless, turning §512 of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act into something quite different than what you would think it is just by reading it.

As Eric G. notes, “unless the 512(f) plaintiff has smoking-gun evidence of the copyright owner’s bad intent before filing the complaint, the plaintiff has virtually no chance of getting a 512(f) claim into discovery.”

Comments on the Megaupload Prosecution (a Long-Delayed Linkwrap)

The Megaupload case is one of those things that is extremely troubling, but it can be hard to explain exactly why it’s troubling in a pithy way. But here’s a quote from Eric G. that does a pretty good job:

The government is using its enforcement powers to accomplish what most copyright owners haven’t been willing to do in civil court (i.e., sue Megaupload for infringement); and the government is doing so by using its incredibly powerful discovery and enforcement tools that vastly exceed the tools available in civil enforcement; and the government’s bringing the prosecution in part because of the revolving door between government and the content industry (where some of the decision-makers green-lighting the enforcement action probably worked shoulder-to-shoulder with the copyright owners making the request) plus the Obama administration’s desire to curry continued favor and campaign contributions from well-heeled sources.

The resulting prosecution is a depressing display of abuse of government authority. It’s hard to comprehensively catalog all of the lawless aspects of the US government’s prosecution of Megaupload …

Megaupload’s website is analogous to a printing press that constantly published new content. Under our Constitution, the government can’t simply shut down a printing press, but that’s basically what our government did when it turned Megaupload off and seized all of the assets. Not surprisingly, shutting down a printing press suppresses countless legitimate content publications by legitimate users of Megaupload. Surprisingly (shockingly, even), the government apparently doesn’t care about this “collateral,” entirely foreseeable and deeply unconstitutional effect.

What do these three recent developments all have in common? Big guys win, little guys lose. Sometimes law is very dispiriting.

Tags: , , ,

Comments are closed.