Court Declares Unconstitutional Illinois Law Against Taping of Police

The Chicago Federal Center, home to the Seventh Circuit (Photo: EEJ)

From a press release from the Reporters Committee for the Freedom of the Press:

The Seventh U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals stood up for the public’s right to be informed about the actions of public officials Tuesday when it declared unconstitutional provisions in the Illinois wiretapping law that prohibits audio recording of police activity in public places.

The Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press had argued in a friend-of-the-court brief to the Chicago-based court that the overbroad law was a danger to journalists’ and the public’s First Amendment rights.

“This decision is a First Amendment slam-dunk. The court could not have been clearer about the importance of protecting the public’s right to observe and record the actions of public officials in public places,” said Reporters Committee Executive Director Lucy A. Dalglish. “Although Chicago police had indicated they would not enforce the law during the NATO Summit later this month – which we all expect will be accompanied by protests and police activity – it’s nice to have the force of the court’s decision on the right to record those events.”

“The notion that audio recording police activity in a public place, where there is no expectation of privacy, constitutes a felony is absurd and advances absolutely no government interest,” Dalglish added. “We are delighted that the appeals court agreed.”

One little nit: I don’t understand where they get “Seventh U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals” from. The full name is the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit. So you can shorten it to the U.S. Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals, if you like, but it makes no sense to put the “U.S.” between “Seventh” and “Circuit.” It’s kind of like putting something between “United” and “States.” Okay, I guess it’s not that bad. But it’s wrong.

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