Posts Tagged ‘Lisa Di Valentino’

Lisa Di Valentino: An Annotated Bibliography of Open Access and Legal Publishing

Monday, March 28th, 2011

Lisa Di Valentino has posted to SSRN Open Access and Legal Publishing: An Annotated Bibliography. This seems to me like an enormously useful document.

Di Valentino is a research assistant and J.D. candidate at University of Western Ontario where she works with the Faculty of Information and Media Studies.

The issue is near and dear to my heart. One key question implicates blogs: whether publishing in print law journals does more or less to contribute to scholarly discourse than blogging. Di Valentino finds that “there is a theoretical approval of open access publishing for legal scholarship, but a certain amount of resistance in practice.” I’d have to agree with that.

Here’s the abstract:

Several commentators argue that the law review is well-suited to open access publishing, although it has not been embraced quite as enthusiastically as it might be. Others assert that self-publishing will signal end of the law review as we know it. Some authors express concern that the rise in blogging will have little positive effect, or indeed a detrimental effect, on the general quality of legal scholarship. These views are countered by those who believe that blogging and collaborative editing provide opportunities and benefits to students and scholars and that the new methods of communicating will give rise to new methods of evaluating works.

Other issues are brought up such as the demographics of the audience for legal writing, the responsibilities of the legal scholar, the use of open access in legal education, the benefits of university repositories, and advice for young professors who are considering publishing in open access journals.

A few of the articles were written before the open access campaign gained momentum around 2006-2007. These articles are included to demonstrate the history of and impetus behind the open access movement.

The conclusion one might draw from the following articles is that there is a theoretical approval of open access publishing for legal scholarship, but a certain amount of resistance in practice. However, open access publishing is gaining in popularity, and it is possible that the next generation of legal scholars, accustomed to finding information online, will embrace open access as the standard manner of publishing.