Posts Tagged ‘Netherlands’

Zuiderveen Borgesius on the Right to Be Forgotten

Monday, February 27th, 2017

Frederik J. Zuiderveen Borgesius of the University of Amsterdam – IViR Institute for Information Law (IViR) has posted to SSRN Het ‘Right to Be Forgotten’ En Bijzondere Persoonsgegevens: Geen Ruimte Meer Voor Een Belangenafweging? (The ‘Right to Be Forgotten’ and Sensitive Personal Data: No Room for Balancing?).

The paper is in Dutch, but here is the abstract in English:

An attorney submitted a ‘right to be forgotten’ delisting request to Google, regarding a blog post about a criminal conviction of the attorney in another country. The Rotterdam District Court ruled that Google may no longer link to the blog post when people search for the attorney’s name. The court granted the attorney’s request because the blog post concerns a criminal conviction. Personal data regarding criminal convictions are, under Dutch law, special categories of data (sometimes called sensitive data). The reasoning of the court on special categories of data creates problems for freedom of expression. This paper, in Dutch, explores how these problems can be reduced. Google has appealed the decision; the judgment of the Court of Appeals is expected in March 2017.

Dutch Conference on Internet Freedom Highlights Plight of Bloggers Under Oppressive Regimes

Monday, December 26th, 2011

Logo for Freedom Online 8 & 9 December 2011 Joint Action for Free Expression on the InternetEarlier this month the Netherlands’ Ministry of Foreign Affairs hosted a conference called Freedom Online: Joint Action for Free Expression on the Internet. The conference was attended by more than 20 countries and NGOs, including the United States, which sent Secretary of State Hilary Clinton.

One particular subject of discussion was the need to help bloggers in countries ruled by oppressive regimes. There’s a good write up by Toby Sterling of the Associated Press: EU official: Protect bloggers from repressive governments.

Secretary Clinton, who opened the conference, issuing a call for companies to refuse to sell surveillance technologies to repressive governments. It’s wonderful to see the U.S. take a leadership stance on internet freedom, but there’s some irony as well.

Syrian blogger Amjad Baiazy, who was arrested and tortured earlier this year because of his online writing, noted that Western companies surveillance system that Syria’s been using to ferret out internet dissidents.

And Dutch member of parliament Marietje Schaake, while dittoing Clinton’s call for restraint among tech companies, took the U.S. to task for Congressional consideration of SOPA (the proposed Stop Online Piracy Act,” which, she said, “give great incentives to governments like China to do the same,” blocking access to expression they find inappropriate.

Important points, all around.

Mike Masnick on Outsourced IP Policing

Tuesday, December 28th, 2010

From Mike Masnick in TechDirt:

[W]ith our [U.S.] government often believing just about anything Hollywood tells them, and with a long term effort by the industry to have the government act as its own private police force, we’re seeing things like the totally botched seizure of domain names of blogs and forums on a questionable basis.

The outsourcing of police work to trade groups is not unique to the USA, as Masnick notes. He reports on similar ploys afoot in the Netherlands, and it turns out that at least one Dutch court is fed up. That court dismissed a criminal action when Dutch police relied on an industry group, BREIN, to do the investigating for them.

More from Masnick: